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Just had a coffee break discussion about reasons to make sure you give credit where credit is due when blogging, even if that credit is due to a direct competitor.
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Creative Commons License photo credit: takingthemoney
Let’s think of some examples of where you might be tempted to not give credit:

  • A competitor writes a great article, you think “I could do that” and simply cannibalise the article and pretend it’s all your own work
  • You find a great resource thanks to a competitor sharing it on Twitter or similar, and you give the impression you found it all by yourself.

But here’s why you should not be frightened to just link that article or thank them for the heads up:

  1. You’ll annoy them if you don’t, which will increase the likelihood of them bad-mouthing you.
  2. By linking  they may do the same for you one day.  And if you add additional insight in the process they may even:
    1. comment on your blog giving you authority
    2. link to your post from their own.
  3. SEO-wise, its not a bad idea.

Is it really necessary to mention someone’s tweet of a link?  The short answer is no, but go beyond the call of duty and you’ll get noticed.

Picture the situation: you’re in a pitch with five competitors and the potential client asks “Do you know Company X (you)?” If you’ve got a good relationship with your competitors, none of them can say a bad word against you.

The way celebrity chefs work together is a great example of ‘competitors’ working together, knowing that success for one brushes off on the others.

This post is all my own work but credit goes to so many influencers – too many to mention :)

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