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In a recent post I discussed Jaynie Smith’s concept of Blah – the idea that most of what we write and say about our businesses is just seen as being “Blah” because everybody makes pretty much the same claims.

Lets look at some AdWords adverts being used at the moment on a search for “red wine”:

  1. “Great Offers on a Huge Range of Red Wine to Buy Online!”
  2. “Single bottles of wine stylishly packaged. Prices from 19.99 – 999”
  3. “Discover a Fantastic Range of Red Wine Delivered to Your Door!”
  4. “Huge Range of Fantastic Red Wines Delivered to Your Door!”
  5. “An excellent selection of fine wine with many special offers”
  6. “6 excellent wines – 50% off with free corkscrew worth 24”
  7. “Looking to find red wine? Browse our red wine directory.”

How much Blah can you see? To me Ads 1,3,4,5 and 7 just blur completely.

2 and 6 stand out because they report hard facts that are suggestive of being different to the rest. It may well be that all the other sites have wines from 19.99 to 999, but because nobody is telling me otherwise, I would probably click onto ad 2.

Ad 6 may just look a good offer rather than a competitive advantage but it is in fact a competitive advantage, even if only momentarily.

Here is a couple of good ads I found much further down the list that will no doubt get clicked on more frequently than others that far down the list

  • “Over 25,000 wines available on one easy to use website.”
  • “Australia’s most prestigious red wine for over four decades.”

Note the quantification – “Over 25,000”, “Over four decades”. There may be many sites with over 25,000 wines but because nobody else is claiming it, the advertiser takes the advantage.

The “most prestigious” is something difficult to prove but if you can prove it then it is very nice competitive positioning.

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